Suicidal behaviour among the Netsilik Eskimos: R42-3/1960-2E-PDF

"During two field trips in the summer of 1959 and the winter of 1960 among the Arviligjuar Eskimos of Pelly Bay, District of Keewatin, a considerable number of successful and attempted suicide cases were recorded. The survey also gathered data on interpersonal and intergroup relations, namely shaman-patient, shaman-shaman interactions, sharing practices, problems of circulation of women, parents-descendants relations, feuding, etc. A first analysis of this material indicated a very low level of social integration of traditional Netsilik society."--p. [1].

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Department/Agency Indian and Northern Affairs.
Title Suicidal behaviour among the Netsilik Eskimos
Series Title [NCRC] ;
Publication Type Series - View Master Record
Language [English]
Format Electronic
Electronic Document

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Note "November, 1960." Digitized edition from print [produced by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada]. "This article was read at the Annual Canadian Political Science Association meetings held in Kingston, Ontario, June, 1960. It is reproduced with authors permission by the Northern Co-ordination and Research Centre as a contribution to the knowledge of Northern Canada."
Date 1960.
Number of Pages 26, [1] p.
Catalogue Number
  • R42-3/1960-2E-PDF
Subject Terms Inuit, Suicide, Social issues